Newspaper article Fraser Coast Chronicle (Hervey Bay, Australia)

Suby a Fence-Sitter; Exiga Not Quite an SUV and Not Quite a People-Mover Either, Writes Vani Naidoo

Newspaper article Fraser Coast Chronicle (Hervey Bay, Australia)

Suby a Fence-Sitter; Exiga Not Quite an SUV and Not Quite a People-Mover Either, Writes Vani Naidoo

Article excerpt

There is something about the Liberty Exiga that makes you sit up and take notice.

It's not quite that feeling of elation that fills your tummy when you buy that dress or pair shoes that you "simply had to have". Nor is it that feeling of queasy dread you get when you open Aunt Agnes's Christmas present to reveal the matching mustard throw to go with the crocheted cushions she gave you last year. No, it's somewhere in between.

In between, as it turns out, is pretty apt phrase for the Exiga Co a car that is not a SUV but not quite a people mover either.

Subaru, a company that prides itself on customer satisfaction, apparently released the Exiga for those lovers of the brand who wanted something more than a Liberty and less than a Tribeca.

The six-seater, all-wheel drive is something of a gamble especially at a time when consumers are demanding the world for minimum outlay.

The Exiga is modelled on the Liberty and pretty much stays true to the accomplished performance of that vehicle.

The Exiga's 2.5-litre boxer engine is mated to an excellent lineartronic continuously variable transmission.

It allows engine revs to vary during acceleration and contributes to more efficient fuel use.

It is well mannered on the open road and respectful in city driving delivering a polished no-nonsense performance.

It soaks up bumps well but it is apparent that a suspension modified for Australian conditions was built more for comfort than cornering ability.

Perhaps Subaru is hoping that equipping the Exiga with a cupboard full of bells and whistles will detract from the loss of the seventh seat.

As it happens the company was forced to trade in a third passenger in the second row for a five-star safety rating, a valuable commodity in this country.

Three point seatbelts are required for a full ANCAP node and since that was not a viable option for the passenger in the centre position, he was replaced by, well, cup holders. …

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