Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

CAMERON: PAKISTAN EXPORTING TERROR; PRIME MINISTER IGNITES SECOND DIPLOMATIC ROW ON FOREIGN TRIP HIS OUTBURST WILL ENRAGE KEY ALLY IN WAR ON TALIBAN Cameron Apologises for Calling Britain 'Junior Partner' in 1940 PM Tries to Paper over Cabinet Rift on Immigration as Rows Blight Tour

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

CAMERON: PAKISTAN EXPORTING TERROR; PRIME MINISTER IGNITES SECOND DIPLOMATIC ROW ON FOREIGN TRIP HIS OUTBURST WILL ENRAGE KEY ALLY IN WAR ON TALIBAN Cameron Apologises for Calling Britain 'Junior Partner' in 1940 PM Tries to Paper over Cabinet Rift on Immigration as Rows Blight Tour

Article excerpt

Byline: Paul Waugh Deputy Political Editor

DAVID CAMERON sparked a fresh foreign policy row today when he said Pakistan should not be allowed "to promote the export of terror" across the world.

For the second time in two days, the Prime Minister's directness became an issue as he embarked on a trip to India to boost Britain's overseas trade.

Yesterday Mr Cameron infuriated Israel and some of his backbenchers when he used a visit to Turkey to describe Gaza as a "prison camp".

Today, he stepped up the rhetoric against Pakistan, seen as a key ally in the fight against the Taliban in Afghanistan, over accusations that it supports terrorist groups.

"We should be very, very clear with Pakistan that we want to see a strong, stable and democratic Pakistan," he said during a question and answer session in Bangalore.

"But we cannot tolerate in any sense the idea that this country is allowed to look both ways and is able, in any way, to promote the export of terror whether to India, whether to Afghanistan or to anywhere else in the world.

"That is why this relationship is important. It should be a relationship based on a very clear message -- that it is not right to have any relations with groups that are promoting terror."

Mr Cameron said it was an issue he discussed with President Obama last week and would talk about it tomorrow with Indian prime minister Manmohan Singh. His remarks follow fresh claims this week about the role of Pakistan's intelligence service. US military documents passed to Wikileaks suggested that Pakistan's ISI had plotted to assassinate president Hamid Karzai of Afghanistan.

Although Mr Cameron's words delighted his Indian audience, they risked a rift with Islamabad at a time when Britain is seeking to get it on board over Afghan policy .

The Prime Minister today apologised for his gaffe in Washington last week when he said that Britain had been the "junior partner" to the US in 1940. He told the BBC he had meant the latter part of the Second World War and that "1940 is the proudest year in all of British history".

As he travelled around India to promote trade links, Mr Cameron was also struggling to contain the Government's splits over immigration policy and their impact on overseas investment for Britain. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.