Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Life Class Catherine Blyth on a Good Argument Go to Theschooloflife.Com

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Life Class Catherine Blyth on a Good Argument Go to Theschooloflife.Com

Article excerpt

As summer sinks into silly season, I miss the World Cup. The soccer stank but there were still delicious spectacles. Yes, Ronaldo's torso. Better yet was watching spoilt youths rage at referees (presumably 'No' is rarely heard if you're on [pounds sterling]100,000 a week). Likewise, wasn't Alastair Campbell baiting Sky's Adam Boulton your General Election highlight? Their barney is a YouTube classic not just because Boulton turns a startling shade of puce. When public figures expose their unscripted inner Eltons, it satisfies more than Schadenfreude. Connoisseurship of conflict is a national sport. TV is usually blamed for this. Especially the shouty 'talk' shows that serve as televisual espresso on daytime, and soaps where little chats routinely end 'outside - now!' But such stunted debates differ little from jousts on Newsnight. Broadcasters rig conversations as bouts because disagreement grips audiences as no analysis can.

Everyone loves a ruckus because conflict is the DNA of drama. Spats have the entertaining qualities of momentum, passion and clearly differentiated positions. For participants, however, 'telling it like it is' can be the worst way to get views across, unless your aim is simply to use each other as scratching posts. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.