Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Knock-Out Blow Leaves Andy Nursing a Massive Headache; Tired World No4 Has Plenty to Think about after His Grand Slam Campaign Ends in a Very Painful Defeat. Chris Jones Reports from New York

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Knock-Out Blow Leaves Andy Nursing a Massive Headache; Tired World No4 Has Plenty to Think about after His Grand Slam Campaign Ends in a Very Painful Defeat. Chris Jones Reports from New York

Article excerpt

Byline: Chris Jones

ANDY MURRAY arrived here as one of the favourites for the US Open but will fly home trying to figure out why fatigue and a host of injuries saw him put in his worst Grand Slam performance since early 2008.

The world No4 was at a loss to explain why he felt so lethargic during his 6-7, 7-6, 6-3, 6-3 third-round defeat to Stanislas Wawrinka last night.

Murray needed two medical timeouts so his thigh could be treated and also complained of pain in his back, neck and eyes.

After almost four hours of inconsistent tennis the British No1 was left to reflect on his earliest exit at a Slam since a first-round defeat to Jo-Wilfried Tsonga at the 2008 Australian Open.

How far the injuries undermined him against the Swiss is unclear given he cannot explain how he lost so badly. There are also concerns over Murray's left wrist which still gives him problems a year after he complained of pain when Marin Cilic beat him in straights sets here.

The Scot went out a round earlier this year sensing he was short of energy and said: "I haven't felt that way for a few years. I'm going to have to look at why that was the case and try and get better.

"I had a chance to win the second and didn't take it. I tried to find a way to come back but didn't quite do it. I haven't been in that position for a long time and maybe frustration had something to do with it. I felt like my chance of doing well here was slipping away.

"I am going to go home to have a rest because I need it and see what I decide to do after that.

"I will speak to all the guys I work with and see what's gone well this year, what hasn't gone so well. This is the one match in the majors that I lost that I probably should have won."

Murray's body language was negative for large parts of a match that he really should have wrapped up in straight sets -- despite various irritations with his body and in his mind. …

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