Newspaper article The Northern Star (Lismore, Australia)

Pre-Empting Professional Jealousy; Give a Green-Eyed Worker Plenty to Do and Keep Them off Committees

Newspaper article The Northern Star (Lismore, Australia)

Pre-Empting Professional Jealousy; Give a Green-Eyed Worker Plenty to Do and Keep Them off Committees

Article excerpt

WOULD you like a promotion at work? If so, look around to see if someone is blocking your progress.

You know how this goes. You're the prime candidate for a promotion, but you sense that someone is going to mess things up.

This person will casually tell the boss that you hate flying. This phobia, the boss will assess, might interfere with meetings you'll be required to attend all over the country.

Or, the jealous colleague might ask you if you have trouble getting your allergy medications through an airport. He asks this in front of a room full of people.

Backstabbers live in almost every work setting. To overcome sabotage, which is likely to happen if you're good at your job, you have to be clever. You've got to speak up early on.

These tips can help:

Talk privately with a human relations (HR) manager. Sit down with someone who can document the jealousy issues. State your concerns clearly.

Act out benevolent behaviours. Let co-workers know you are a team player. They'll get the true picture of what's going on.

Treat the jealous person with kindness. Even if everyone knows you're unhappy about the jealousy, try to be civil toward this person. Outclass him or her.

It's embarrassing to admit to other people that a co-worker could be jealous of you. After all, isn't that tantamount to bragging?

"Telling on a jealous person can be stated another way," says an HR manager we'll call Peggy.

"For years, I've called this identifying someone who doesn't live by the Golden Rule."

Peggy says that people with low self-esteem often try to backstab other people. But anything you do to raise someone's self-esteem will simply backfire, says Peggy. These people read you a lot better than you think.

"You can't raise someone's self-esteem," she points out. "The more you try to do for this type of person, the worse it gets. …

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