Newspaper article The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia)

Gardenias Provide Fragrant Additions to Any Garden; Your Yard Will Look Great and Smell Even Better with Pretty Flowers

Newspaper article The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia)

Gardenias Provide Fragrant Additions to Any Garden; Your Yard Will Look Great and Smell Even Better with Pretty Flowers

Article excerpt

ABOUT NEIL

Weekend Buzz columnist Neil Fisher is from Fisher's Nursery, North Rockhampton.

You can chat with Neil on radio 4RO's gardening hour after the 6am news on Tuesdays.

OF all of the perfumed plants, I find the gardenia is one of my favourites, and I would suggest that it is a must for anyone who enjoys fragrance in their garden.

This last week I spend a few days working on the Central Highlands.

When not working I find it pleasant to go for a walk either early in the morning or late in the afternoon.

One of the aspects of these walks that I enjoy is the perfume and aroma of the plants growing in the gardens that you pass.

I was surprised by the variety of gardenias in flower in these gardens.

As well as admiring the scented features of these plants, I have used some native gardenias as a small feature tree surrounding a car park on a unit development.

The variety of native gardenia I used was Randia fitzalani.

During spring, masses of sweetly scented white star-like flowers make a showy display.

This is a species found from Central Queensland through to Cape York and grows into an attractive small tree that is very suitable for street plantings or a shade tree in your own garden.

It is regarded as one of the world's most fragrant flowers and with origins throughout Asia, the South Pacific and tropical Africa, and is highly desirable for the home garden.

Gardenias have been popular for many years, with one gardening book from the 1920s listing the species as "one of the most handsome shrubs a woman could desire for her garden, as it possesses glossy leaves and a large number of creamy-white, thick petalled flowers and very strongly perfumed. A must for any garden".

Most of the flowers on this species have a waxy appearance and somewhat resemble those of camelias, and the colour range varies from the purest of whites to the palest of lemons.

The near-groundcover varieties of Gardenia radicans are one of my particular favourites.

Growing to a maximum of about half a metre high, this dense shrub is ideal to use as an edging plant for a tropical garden, or even to be pruned or shaped to make a border plant for a formal garden. …

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