Newspaper article News Mail Bundaberg Qld.

Actress Finds Her Dark Side; McLeavy Delivers Top Performance as Psychopathic A[euro][approximately]monster' in the Loved Ones

Newspaper article News Mail Bundaberg Qld.

Actress Finds Her Dark Side; McLeavy Delivers Top Performance as Psychopathic A[euro][approximately]monster' in the Loved Ones

Article excerpt

Byline: Nathanael Cooper

ROBIN McLeavy's decision to pursue a role in Australia's latest offering to the horror film genre was an interesting choice.

She absolutely nails the role of psychotic maniac Lola in The Loved Ones. She is genuinely convincing and portrays the role beautifully.

What makes it so interesting is the fact that she doesn't like horrors.

The demure, polite and sweet young lady would seem more at home in a romantic comedy rather than covered in blood and gore whilst operating a drill as a tool of torture, but the good news is, she does it so well.

"It was a bit of a challenge in that I am a wimp when it comes to horror films," she said.

"But I really fell in love with the character of Lola because it is such a rare thing for women, especially young women, to play psychopathic, unhinged characters.

"I loved that it was the female character who took control of the events and was the one chasing people around with a knife, rather than the woman being chased by the guy with the knife."

Psychopathic and unhinged is the ideal way to describe Robin's character Lola. After asking her crush Brent (expertly portrayed by Twilight star Xavier Samuel) to the prom only to be cruelly rejected, Lola engages her adaddya to exact revenge on her beau.

After kidnapping Brent on prom night and stealing him away to their remote homestead in the Aussie bush, Lola and Daddy's true level of unstableness becomes clear as they make Brent pay for breaking Lola's heart.

But this isn't just a proper telling off. This involves knives being rammed through the feet and salt quite literally rubbed into the wounds.

"It's a really wild roller coaster ride of a film. It's a date movie gone horribly wrong," Robin explains.

"It's got the look of a Tarantino film with the sense of humour that only Australians can produce."

Her description of it having the look of a Tarantino film is telling of the kind of blood and gore you can expect from the film, but the real cleverness doesn't just come from the horror a[pounds sterling] there is so much said without anything being said at all. …

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