Newspaper article The Northern Star (Lismore, Australia)

Food for Thought to Improve Your Mood; Health Conference Looks at Mental Wellbeing and Intellect

Newspaper article The Northern Star (Lismore, Australia)

Food for Thought to Improve Your Mood; Health Conference Looks at Mental Wellbeing and Intellect

Article excerpt

Byline: Alex Easton Chief Reporter

Food mind games

THINGS to eat to improve your mood and sharpen your mind:

Polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as those found in oily fish and avocados;

Minerals, such as zinc, found in whole grains, beans,

meat and milk; magnesium, found in green leafy

vegetables, nuts and whole grains; and iron, found in red

meat, green leafy vegetables, eggs and some fruits;

and;

Vitamins, such as folate, found in green leafy vegetables

and fortified cereals; B vitamins, found in whole-grain products, yeast and dairy products; and antioxidant

vitamins such as C and E, found in many fruits and vegetables.

As an added bonus, a diet rich in those nutrients will also slash your risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, and a variety of other illnesses.

Source: Changing Diets, Changing Minds: how food affects mental well being and behaviour by Courtney Van de Weyer

THEY say you are what you eat a but diet can have as profound an impact on your mental wellbeing and intellect as it can on your waistline, a health conference at Byron Bay will hear this week.

The conference, called Integrative Medicine a What Works!, is aimed at explaining to GPs how they can improve patients' health by co-ordinating with allied health professionals such as naturopaths and herbalists.

Over the two-day conference, being held at the North Beach Byron Resort on Friday and Saturday, doctors will hear from a range of high-level speakers on things such as the potential for acupuncture in emergency departments, the way the Alfred Hospital in Sydney is using a[approximately]integrative care' in its cardiovascular department and the impact of nutrition on mental health care.

Naturopath and one of the conference's directors, Sally Mathrick, said diet had an a[approximately]enormous' impact on mental wellbeing and could be used as an important part of treatments for ser-ious mental illnesses such as schizophrenia. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.