Newspaper article Daily Examiner (Grafton, Australia)

Golfing Vet Calls It Quits Play Time over; Baldwin Draws Curtain on Lengthy Playing Career

Newspaper article Daily Examiner (Grafton, Australia)

Golfing Vet Calls It Quits Play Time over; Baldwin Draws Curtain on Lengthy Playing Career

Article excerpt

Byline: sport editor sport@dailyexaminer.com.au

Baldwin's hit list

NSW layouts Baldwin has played: Castle Cove, Stroud, Ulladulla, Gloucester, Raymond Terrace, Foster, Waratah, Newcastle, Shortland, Nabiac, Cranbeck, Taree, Kendell, Oberon, Bathurst, Orange, Yass, Goulburn, Grafton, Maclean, Yamba, Iluka, Murwillumbah, Ocean Shores, Lismore, Casino, East Maitland, Cessnock, Toukley, Wyong, Way Way, Long Jetty, Gosford, Morisset, Belmont, Westlawn, Coffs Harbour, Sawtell, Urunga, Coolangatta Tweed Heads, Armidale, Inverell, Glen Innes, Tenterfield, Kempsey, Kyogle, Canberra, Mullumbimby, Byron Bay, Nelson Bay.

HE has teed up on 51 golf courses throughout NSW but Junction Hill's Ross Baldwin calls just one of them home.

"Westlawn was my favourite course because I played there for 26 years," the 83-year-old said.

A retired police sergeant, Baldwin enjoyed plenty of travelling as part of his job before finally landing in the Clarence Valley a and on Westlawn's course a in 1984.

The one-time club secretary, long-time player and Westlawn life member has just hauled the clubs into the boot of the car for the final time.

Not that he is walking away from the game.

"I'm not confident with my balance anymore, otherwise I'd still be playing," he said.

"It was a tough decision but I haven't lost interest with the club.

"You would go a long way to find a better bunch of people.

"But I'll still assist with results every week."

Baldwin has been amusing those at the club for more than two decades, and plans to continue.

It all began with a avery amateurisha round of golf at Castle Cove, Sydney in 1948.

"It was a disaster," Baldwin said.

"I knew the basics but it was just horrible.

"I just mishit the ball."

A move to Stroud in 1950, where Baldwin astarted to play golf a bit more seriouslya, ensured an improvement in his game a as well as some unusual sights.

The course was located on the town common, meaning cattle and wire fences around the greens were additional hazards

"The local rule was if you hit one of the wire fences you got to replay your shot," Baldwin laughed. …

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