Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Animal Hospital Breaking Ground; the Humane Society's New Facility Will Be Completed Next Fall

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Animal Hospital Breaking Ground; the Humane Society's New Facility Will Be Completed Next Fall

Article excerpt

Byline: DAN SCANLAN

The first step in a renewed Jacksonville Humane Society campus starts this morning with an official groundbreaking of its new Community Animal Hospital.

But after a few shovels of dirt kick off the $2.7 million project, the self-proclaimed "road to recovery" for a facility gutted by fire three years ago is just beginning, society officials said.

When the 6,500-square-foot animal hospital is done next fall, sights will be set on the overdue replacement for a modular building that has been the pet adoption center since the 2007 fire at the 30-acre Beach Boulevard site.

Think about these new buildings as steps in fully realizing the efforts to care for pets, find them new homes and renew education about pet adoption, said Humane Society Executive Director Leona Sheddan.

"We want it to be a continuous project and we want people to see it that way," she said. "It is a road to recovery, and while it has taken longer than we hoped, we thank the Jacksonville community for keeping us in business and being so patient and still coming and adopting in uncomfortable facilities."

A low-cost veterinarian center is an "awesome" idea, and the planned adoption and education center is needed, too, said Friends of Jacksonville Animals president Sherri Audette. Friends is a nonprofit volunteer group that helps Jacksonville shelter animals with medical care, promotes adoption and works to reduce euthanasia.

"A lot of people don't adopt animals because they can't afford to take animals to the vet and care for them," Audette said. "And the more information you can get out to people, the better off the animals are. People who really want to care for animals will seek out that environment."

The Jacksonville Humane Society was founded in 1885 and now houses and adopts out more than 4,000 animals each year as a no-kill, nonprofit facility. It moved to its current home on Beach Boulevard in 2006. But a year later, a fire destroyed much of its facilities and killed 85 animals. The facility reopened in two modular buildings in the parking lot, the hope to replace them soon. Then the economy faltered in mid-2008, Sheddan said. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.