Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

That Awful. Sickening Felling Returned to Haunt Fans; Deja-Vu on Tyneside as Striker's: Sale Turns January Hope into Abject Despair: CHRONICLE Chief Sports Writer LEE RYDER'S Verdict on the Transfer Deal That Has Rocked Tyneside

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

That Awful. Sickening Felling Returned to Haunt Fans; Deja-Vu on Tyneside as Striker's: Sale Turns January Hope into Abject Despair: CHRONICLE Chief Sports Writer LEE RYDER'S Verdict on the Transfer Deal That Has Rocked Tyneside

Article excerpt

IT was the worst imaginable outcome to a January transfer window which was on the brink of being a total success.

Andy Carroll remaining unsold, Stephen Ireland on board, Hatem Ben Arfa tied up on a permanent deal and Joey Barton and Jose Enrique close to agreeing new contracts at St James' Park.

However, as the day unfolded, a sick feeling of deja-vu swept across Tyneside.

Toon fans had been more than encouraged by Mike Ashley's resistance to hold on to Carroll after a series of cheeky bids from Tottenham were spurned by the Magpies.

With just one day left to play out in the transfer window it looked like Toon fans would be toasting that success last night.

Yet the chain of events which unfolded yesterday afternoon, and which eventually resulted in a pounds 35m bid from Liverpool being accepted and the player heading to Merseyside by air for a medical, meant the Toon No 9 was always going to be on his way.

Putting aside the circumstances which led up to his departure, the lowdown is Newcastle have lost one of the most exciting young talents in English football to a rival club.

Newcastle's loss is Liverpool's gain.

Just two months ago, Newcastle and Carroll outclassed the Reds at St James' Park with the Geordie lad scoring one of his greatest goals in a black-and- white shirt.

That feeling of immense Geordie pride as it flew into the back of the Gallowgate could easily be replaced with the most sickening feeling possible in football if the roles are reversed at Anfield - where Newcastle usually get smashed up - when Carroll, in the red of Liverpool, shows us what we are missing in April.

Toon fans have been here before when Peter Beardsley, Paul Gascoigne and Chris Waddle left the club in the 1980s, the difference being that trio wanted to leave to better their careers.

Carroll wanted to fulfil his best years and potential in a black-andwhite shirt.

The Teams lad never made a secret of that, and was bursting with pride when Chris Hughton handed him the sacred No 9 shirt.

When Carroll first burst on to the scene he told me in pokey corridors of Kingston Park he dreamed of being the next Alan Shearer one day and even attempting to break Big Al's record.

He quickly went on to fulfil his potential in the reserves, with then coach Lee Clark overwhelmed by the raw gangly striker United had on their hands.

It was obvious Carroll was a cut above the other kids in the reserve team - and not just in stature.

In a reserve game five years ago against Everton, current Rangers star and Scotland international David Weir walked off the pitch asking: "Who the heck was that?" That lad was Carroll.

Like most Toon players, he's had an abundance of managers, but it was Glenn Roeder who threw him his debut in 2006 in Palermo in the UEFA Cup on a mild night in Sicily when he became the club's youngest ever player. …

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