Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Moving into the Garage Requires Careful Planning; in the Last of His Occasional Series on the Importance of Building Regulations, Paul Cellini Looks at Garage Conversions

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Moving into the Garage Requires Careful Planning; in the Last of His Occasional Series on the Importance of Building Regulations, Paul Cellini Looks at Garage Conversions

Article excerpt

THE days when garages were used simply for putting cars in have long gone. These days the car is often left in the drive while the garage has become a store room, dumping ground or somewhere for the washing machine.

And people who need extra space in their home often think of it as an easy way to gain another room. If you have a brick or block garage attached to your house it is probably suitable for conversion. However, there are additional matters you may wish to consider: Are there any structural problems with the garage? Is it damp or does the roof leak? How will you access the room? Have you got, or can you, put a doorway through from the house? Will you have enough parking and storage without the garage? Is there enough room to provide the accommodation you require or would you be better off extending or moving? Is your garage built from an unusual construction? For example prefabricated panels or concrete frame.

Professional advice is vital before you proceed and if you are in any doubt call the Building Control section at your local authority for free, impartial advice.

The next step is to make your Building Regulations application to ensure the works comply with current legislation and make sure it is inspected by a qualified building surveyor throughout the project.

Further information on the procedure is contained in the Tyne & Wear Building Control: Guide to Extending Your Home booklet which is available from the Building Control Section at your local authority.

However, below is a quick look at what to expect during the course of such a project.

Infilling the garage door opening THIS tends to be the most visible part of the conversion from the outside and the infill material, usually brickwork, will require support either from a foundation or concrete lintels placed below ground level.

A trial hole may be necessary to see if there is an existing foundation. If there is no existing foundation, a new one will have to be constructed or on shorter spans, suitable reinforced concrete lintels could be used supported on the existing foundation on either side.

The correct construction materials must be used to ensure structural stability, resist damp penetration and be thermally efficient. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.