Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Interviewers Not Up to the Job; Not Hired? It May Not Be Your Fault That the Interview Was a Disaster -- Many Interviewers Are Failing to Do Their Job Properly. by Niki Chesworth

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Interviewers Not Up to the Job; Not Hired? It May Not Be Your Fault That the Interview Was a Disaster -- Many Interviewers Are Failing to Do Their Job Properly. by Niki Chesworth

Article excerpt

Byline: Niki Chesworth

SORRY, what's your name? It's not the best way to start an interview. However, a third of interviewers are so ill prepared they have forgotten a candidate's name, according to a poll of the worst experiences in job interviews.

Some interviewers seem to think that their role is to grill candidates -- so much so, that one in seven interviewees admits they have been reduced to tears by a job interview.

Particular stress is caused by lack of effort from prospective employers, with arrogance (62 per cent), poor preparation (42 per cent) and irrelevant questions (43 per cent) being identified as the most off-putting interviewer habits.

Interviewers were surprisingly candid about their lack of preparation with almost a third (30 per cent) saying that they have forgotten a candidate's name, over a quarter (28 per cent) confessing they have gone to interviews unprepared and almost one in five (19 per cent) even admitting that they have forgotten an interview entirely.

The research from monster.co.uk also shows that first impressions really do count, with 54 per cent of employer respondents admitting that they have taken an instant dislike to a candidate.

Many candidates also claimed that they had been asked questions about their marital status, plans for children and even their religious beliefs in interviews.

However, employers are not the only party guilty when putting in the groundwork -- a quarter (26 per cent) of the candidates surveyed think that researching the person interviewing them was the least important homework and 25 per cent admitted arriving late to a job interview. Although this figure is somewhat at odds with the employer perspective -- 81 per cent claim to have experienced a candidate arriving late for an interview. The poll further reveals that nearly half (45 per cent) of candidate respondents don't think that looking for interview advice online is an important preparation task. …

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