Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

I Want World to Know That She's My Mam; Poorly Girl's Tribute to Her 'Rock'

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

I Want World to Know That She's My Mam; Poorly Girl's Tribute to Her 'Rock'

Article excerpt

Byline: VICKY ROBSON

MAM in a million Samantha Murray today told of her secret fear her son may have the same life-threatening condition as his big sister.

Samantha was devastated when daughter Abigail was diagnosed with NF1, or neurofibromatosis, a condition which causes growths in the body which can become cancerous, in 2008.

Since then the youngster has spent countless spells in hospital and endured chemotherapy treatment in a bid to stop tumours on her brain and spine from growing.

Devoted Samantha has been by Abigail's side every step of the way and even helped her to write a book, called The Little Princess Who Lost Her Hair, about the condition from a child's point of view.

So far, around 600 copies have been sold worldwide and raised hundreds of pounds for two cancer charities - Clic Sargent and Pathways for All.

But despite being a tower of strength for her family, Samantha, who has non-malignant NF1 herself, now fears her two-year-old son Alastair may also have inherited the lifethreatening disorder from her.

"The past couple of years have been pretty horrific. Very up and down and it just seems to have been one thing after another," said Samantha.

She added: "I found out I was pregnant again when Abigail was undergoing treatment so it was stress on top of stress, because at the time I didn't know how serious it was going to be for her.

"She was really ill. She had lots of blood transfusions. And it will always be there. She will never get rid of it and as the years go on, she will get more tumours in her body.

"I feel very guilty because I blame myself for what has happened to her. At the moment, we don't think Alastair has got it, but we won't really know until he's around five."

The disease, which causes tumours to form in the nerve tissue of the skin in the brain and spinal cord, is genetically-transmitted. …

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