Newspaper article The Chronicle (Toowoomba, Australia)

Art Galleries Display Uplifting Work; Exhibitions Seamlessly Mix History with Technique and Imagination

Newspaper article The Chronicle (Toowoomba, Australia)

Art Galleries Display Uplifting Work; Exhibitions Seamlessly Mix History with Technique and Imagination

Article excerpt

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ONE of the real pleasures of wandering around a regional art gallery is the often serendipitous encounters we experience with examples of uplifting artwork. This is true of current exhibitions at the Toowoomba Regional Art Gallery which seamlessly mix history with technique and imagination.

The Toowoomba Regional Art Gallery is host to C[pounds sterling]Days of Summer,C[yen] a jubilant and exuberant celebration of floral colour by the Italio-Australian artist Salvatore Zofrea.

The large woodcut prints of native flowers and birds seem to dance around the walls like a succession of bright flowery dresses.

The vibrancy and the intensity are almost over whelming, and yet the artist, a three-times winner of the prestigious Sulman Prize for subject painting, has captured the sensation of summer as an emotional presence.

The prints are hand-coloured on Japanese Washi paper and Zofrea has used a traditional Japanese technique of applying the pigment to the reverse side of the paper to achieve his suffusion of colour.

Also at the Toowoomba Regional Art Gallery is C[pounds sterling]Drawings,C[yen] an exhibition of works selected from the City Collection.

A range of techniques and media has been used in bold, subtle, and dramatic ways to create a fascinating insight into individual ways of seeing a subject.

Of the many rewarding pieces, those particularly memorable include Trevor Weekes's large and detailed plan drawing C[pounds sterling]The perfect Trojan horseC[yen] in coloured pencil. Robin Parnell's succulent sculptural nude in charcoal is like an exotic fruit while David Seibert's fragmented gestures are a flutter of movement.

David Paulson's searing self portrait, the wispy hair of George Baldessin's figure, and the collaged details used by Ann Thompson and Robert Kinder add interest and intrigue to this elegant and comprehensive exhibition. …

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