Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Dress Sense; KATE MIDDLETON HAS CHOSEN A DISTINCTIVE DESIGN FOR TODAY'S CEREMONY, SO HOW DOES IT COMPARE WITH ROYAL GOWNS OF THE PAST 40 YEARS, ASKS OUR FASHION EDITOR LAURA CRAIK

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Dress Sense; KATE MIDDLETON HAS CHOSEN A DISTINCTIVE DESIGN FOR TODAY'S CEREMONY, SO HOW DOES IT COMPARE WITH ROYAL GOWNS OF THE PAST 40 YEARS, ASKS OUR FASHION EDITOR LAURA CRAIK

Article excerpt

Byline: Laura Craik

1 Princess anne 1973

In the Seventies there was a vogue for long-sleeved, high-necked wedding dresses that purists can only weep about, so far have we come from this aesthetic. How lovely it was that Princess Anne designed the dress herself, with the (considerable) help of Maureen Baker, chief designer for Susan Small. We love the double sleeve effect, with the puff version just peeping out from the Guinevere sleeve. As befits such an unshowy person, Princess Anne opted for a modest tiara and veil, which complemented her swept-back hair.

2 diana sPencer 1981

This was the ultimate fantasy wedding dress. Designed by two unknowns, Elizabeth and David Emanuel, it was a meringue of a gown, a melange of puff-sleeved bombast, antique lace and ivory taffeta. And, of course, there was the memorable 25ft train, majestically fanning out behind 20-year-old Diana as she mounted the steps of St Paul's Cathedral. Such was the scale and volume of the gown that it all but drowned her, highlighting her youth and fragility.

3 sarah Ferguson 1986

Are those shoulder pads? Well, yes: this was the Eighties. Sarah chose a relative unknown, Lindka Cierach, to design her gown, "to show her love for Andrew". Five years after Diana's wedding, the Emanuels' influence is still apparent in the princessy feel of this dress. While we can imagine her having lobbied for a 26ft train to trump Diana's, hers was a modest 17, anchored with crystals that formed the letter "A".

4 Lady heLen Windsor 1992

Long before Lady Helen Windsor became an ambassador for Giorgio Armani, she was a champion of Catherine Walker, who designed her dress. The cap sleeves were an unusual feature while the V-neck with its accompanying shawl collar looked to have been chosen to showcase the pearl necklace, which, with the tiara, was perhaps too much. The Fifties style suited Lady Helen perfectly, and how wonderful that she chose a perky, colourful bouquet instead of dreadful long, white, wilting flowers. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.