Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Comeback in the Pipeline for Tube; Groundbreaking Show to Return 30 Years after It Exploded onto Our Screens

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Comeback in the Pipeline for Tube; Groundbreaking Show to Return 30 Years after It Exploded onto Our Screens

Article excerpt

Byline: Sam Wonfor

COMPOSE yourselves for a time-flying reality jolt - as one of the North East's most celebrated TV shows is poised to make a comeback.

Bonfire night, 2012 will mark 30 years since music show The Tube first hit British screens, introducing Jools Holland, Paula Yates, a raft of global stars, a shedload of raw talent and the concept of anarchic tea-time television to viewers of the newly-launched Channel Four. In the five years that followed, the show, which came live from Tyne Tees Television's Studio Five on City Road, Newcastle, cemented itself in pop culture history as a groundbreaking TV phenomenon: sometimes controversial, sometimes brilliant, sometimes rubbish... but always must-see.

Now, fuelled by a false internet rumour, there are plans to revive The Tube in time to celebrate its three-decade landmark.

Newcastle-born Malcolm Gerrie, one of the show's founders and its producer has revealed embryonic - but very real - ambitions to bring back the show... and the widespread excitement that prospect has created.

Taking a break from preparations for last night's Bafta TV Awards, which his London-based company, Whizz Kid produced, he said: "We had obviously been talking about the fact that it's going to be 30 years since the world changed forever on November 5, 2012, but we hadn't done much about it.

"Then there was a leak out of the blue, that we were planning to use Peaches Geldof - Paula's daughter - as a presenter, and the response was absolutely crackers.

"Twitter was going crazy. The buzz a little thing like that provoked was unbelievable, and we hadn't even made an approach to anyone - or done much about anything.

"But the reaction was so overwhelming, now we're thinking 'actually, we should definitely do something - we have to'."

Known for helping to launch the careers of the likes of Frankie Goes to Hollywood, Terence Trent D'Arby, The Proclaimers and Madonna, The Tube also had a strong commitment to comedy, introducing the world to the then fresh faces of now household names such as French and Saunders, Vic Reeves, Rik Mayall and Adrian Edmondson.

But as well as providing a shop window for success stories of the future, the programme also welcomed a plethora of established superstars. …

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