Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Getting Ahead for Water Aid Charity; Copycat Walk to Mark 30th Anniversary

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Getting Ahead for Water Aid Charity; Copycat Walk to Mark 30th Anniversary

Article excerpt

Byline: Neil McKay

THE sight of 10 men and women walking through the streets with buckets of water on their heads greeted shoppers and visitors to Durham yesterday. The water had been hauled by rope from the River Wear then carried on the heads of Northumbrian Water workers in a re-enactment of scenes carried out daily at wells by millions of women and children in Africa.

The three-mile trek back to Northumbrian Water offices in Pity Me from Durham's Framwellgate Bridge with 20kg of water on their heads was made to mark the 30th anniversary of the charity WaterAid, and to emphasise the importance of clean water to developing countries.

Northumbrian Water facilities manager Dave Whiteley 59, from Tynemouth, North Tyneside, who has been fundraising for WaterAid for 27 years, said: "It astounds me the journey women and children have to take every day, sometimes meaning they miss school, just to find water which is often dirty and unsafe to drink. A child dies every 20 seconds in the developing world from diseases caused by dirty water and poor sanitation.

"The weight of the water is 20kg - like the allowance of luggage when going on holiday. Imagine carrying that weight for up to three miles on your head every day. "The men don't carry the water, they are too lazy. It is left to the women and children who often suffer from back, neck and shoulder injuries.

"But they are able to balance the water on their heads without using hands.

"We have had to use one hand to steady the water otherwise it would have all spilt out by the time we got back to Pity Me, which would have defeated the objectives."

Six years ago, Dave visited the village of Bankolo in Tanzania with WaterAid and helped carry water while he was there. Thanks to WaterAid the village now has its own supply of safe water and the "water carry" is no longer needed. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.