Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

High Risk Streets to Get 20mph Limits; Rules Mapped out on Road Restrictions

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

High Risk Streets to Get 20mph Limits; Rules Mapped out on Road Restrictions

Article excerpt

Byline: Dave Black

ASET of rules governing the introduction of more 20mph speed limits near schools and family homes in Northumberland is set to be laid down by council chiefs next week.

Support from almost three quarters of local people - and at least one speed-related injury accident in the last three years - are among the suggested criteria which would have to be met to justify the tough speed restrictions at selected high risk locations.

County council bosses will consider further applications for 20mph limits following six pilot schemes which were carried out last year in Cramlington, Seaton Sluice, Alnwick, Warkworth, Hexham and Prudhoe at a cost of pounds 36,000. More than 70% of people questioned following the pilots said they wanted to see the schemes extended across the county, and the trials suggested that accidents could be substantially reduced by their introduction. Between 2006 and 2010 there were a total of 12 road accidents in the six trial areas.

But in the 12 months since spring 2010, when the trials began, there were only two accidents, one in Alnwick and one in Hexham.

Councillors are being told that, although some believe that many drivers are not slowing down as a result of the 20mph controls, the public response has been positive.

Next week the council executive will be recommended to agree a formal policy for the implementation of 20mph limits near schools and in selected residential and built-up areas of the county.

The criteria which would have to be met are: ? That 70% of local people living on the streets where the limit will apply are in favour; ? That at least one speed-related, non-fatal personal injury accident has been recorded during the previous three years on the streets where the limit will apply. In the event of a speed-related fatal accident, physical speed reduction measures would be considered, rather than simply a 20mph limit. …

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