Changing the Ethics of Business

Article excerpt

Byline: SONAL MINOCHA

POLITICS has been dominated in the last week or two by issues centring on personal judgement and ethics.

The media has focused on the moral judgements of those in high profile, responsible positions, and highlighted the way that their sometimes questionable attitudes to ethical behaviour have affected their standing and credibility.

The role of university business schools in creating ethical leaders has been a hot topic for some time. Developing ethical managers is undoubtedly a priority for business schools, which are nurturing the next generation of business leaders.

It is also a critical issue for any company that wants to create a culture that will generate long-term trust and loyalty from customers and employees.

What I think is most important for business schools is that rather than ethics being studied as a discrete module of, say, the MBA, ethical challenges should instead be embedded within all core business and management degree modules.

An increasingly globalised business community requires managers who automatically reflect and consider the implications of their actions.

The United States responded to the Enron scandal with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, which requires US-listed companies to have detailed ethical codes. …

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