Newspaper article The Chronicle (Toowoomba, Australia)

Stressed Women More Likely to Have Baby Girls

Newspaper article The Chronicle (Toowoomba, Australia)

Stressed Women More Likely to Have Baby Girls

Article excerpt

ORLANDO: Women who are stressed out while trying for a baby could be more likely to have girls, research suggests.

In the first study of its kind, experts found that high levels of the stress hormone cortisol were associated with the birth of more girls than boys.

Some 338 women from around the UK who were trying to get pregnant kept diaries about their lives, relationships and sex lives, and completed questionnaires about how stressed they felt.

Levels of cortisol and the enzyme alpha-amylase (an indicator of adrenaline) were also measured on day six of the women's monthly cycle for a period of up to six months, or until they fell pregnant.

Cortisol is linked to longer-term chronic stress caused by ill health, a demanding job or money worries.

Adrenaline, frequently called the afight or flighta hormone, is linked to short-term stress.

During the study, 61 per cent (207 women) became pregnant. Of the babies born, 58 were boys and 72 were girls, indicative of a astrong female excessa, the researchers said. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.