Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Titanic Stroke of Luck; Newcastle Lad Calvert Stein and His Family Had a Lucky Escape When They Missed out on a Voyage of the Titanic

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Titanic Stroke of Luck; Newcastle Lad Calvert Stein and His Family Had a Lucky Escape When They Missed out on a Voyage of the Titanic

Article excerpt

Byline: Ray Marshall

IT is strange how things happen to you which seem rather unhelpful at the time, but later you come to regard that very same event as the luckiest break you have ever had. That must have been the case way back in 1912 when little Calvert Stein's father, a tailor, decided he wanted to take his family to the USA.

You see, the Steins - Calvert had three brothers and two sisters - lived in Westgate Road, in Newcastle and Calvert was a pupil of Bath Lane School. Calvert was obviously doing well in his studies but his parents decided a trip across the pond was the best course for the family's future.

So Mr Stein booked his passage and there followed the stroke of luck, because his landlord, looking at the dates of the departure, demanded a month's more rent than Mr Stein thought was due.

Back to the shipping agent went Mr Stein and re-booked his passage, this time a bit earlier to put an end to the landlord's determination to wring every penny out of the family.

It turned out that if the original booking had went ahead, the Stein family would have left these shores aboard probably the most famous ship in the world, the ill-fated Titanic.

But although Calvert later said that he was at the time disappointed not to be sailing on the Titanic, he was to change his tune as the family were spared that dramatic and tragic situation and duly landed in the USA, where Calvert went on to achieve world fame as a brilliant psychiatrist.

In 1972 Calvert made a return trip to his native Tyneside and by then he was internationally famous in the field of neurology and psychiatry, and also a grandfather of six children. Calvert made his name in Springfield, Massachusetts, where he opened a private practice in neuropsychiatry.

He was obviously a busy man because at the same time he was a consulting neuropsychiatrist at the Springfield Hospital Medical Centre, at Westover Air Force Base and the US Armed Forces Examining Station and a captain in the US Naval Reserve - in fact Calvert saw active duty from 1941 until 1946. …

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