Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Sapper Drove a Less Protected Vehicle; Inquest Is Told That Armoured Truck Was out of Action

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Sapper Drove a Less Protected Vehicle; Inquest Is Told That Armoured Truck Was out of Action

Article excerpt

Byline: Neil McKay

ANORTH East soldier killed in Afghanistan was in an armoured vehicle with less protection than others in his convoy, an inquest was told yesterday.

Sapper Daryn Roy, 28, from Dipton, near Stanley, County Durham, was killed by a roadside bomb while on a routine patrol as part of a four-vehicle convoy in the Helmand province on May 3 last year. The hearing into his death was told by Major Jonny Lackem, his commanding officer, that Sapper Roy should have been driving a Husky armoured vehicle, which had stronger protective armour, but it was out of action and required a spare part.

"The part hadn't arrived by the time we left Afghanistan in September of last year," he told the hearing at Newton Aycliffe. Instead, Sapper Roy was behind the wheel of a Panther armoured vehicle which afforded lesser protection.

Two of the vehicles in the convoy were Huskys and the other was a dumper truck.

But Ministry of Defence expert Ian Elgy, who carries out post-incident analysis, while agreeing that a Husky vehicle was bigger and heavier than a Panther, and would have "potentially improved his chances" of surviving the blast, added: "It's far from certain what the outcome would have been."

Coroner Andrew Tweddle, sitting at Newton Aycliffe, told the hearing, attended by members of Sapper Roy's family, that following a post-mortem examination, the forensic pathologist concluded that the soldier would have been unaware of the explosion and would not have experienced any pain.

Evidence was given from two soldiers who were in the Panther armoured vehicle with Daryn, who was driving it on the left-hand side.

Cpl Jim Grundy, who was injured in the blast, said the routine patrol had driven for an hour without incident until 7.30am as they left desert countryside in the area of Nad-e Ali. …

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