Newspaper article The Queensland Times (Ipswich, Australia)

Rich Past Defines Redbank; Early Business Leaders Valued Need for Education

Newspaper article The Queensland Times (Ipswich, Australia)

Rich Past Defines Redbank; Early Business Leaders Valued Need for Education

Article excerpt

Byline: Times Past with Beryl Johnston

REDBANK is one of the oldest settlements in Queensland a as old as or older than Ipswich. Redbank was so named when Major Edmund Lockyer made an excursion up the Brisbane River in September/October 1825 and on seeing the colour of the soil aptly named the area Redbank.

In his journal Major Lockyer wrote: His party of soldiers came suddenly on an encampment of some natives, who on seeing the white men, ran off leaving their kangaroo skins, spears and tomahawks behind.

He landed and examined the weapons and gave strict orders not to remove a single article and he also left some biscuits on the kangaroo skins.

Between 1838 and 1842 a settlement was formed there by the Governor Sir George Gipps of New South Wales and it became known as the Redbank Settlement.

The 1850's brought busy times for Redbank as it was the era in which Mr John (generally known as aTinkera) Campbell established a boiling-down works there.

Around 1855 Mr John Campbell and Sons opened a coal mine in the same area which was managed by Mr William Simpson.

Then in the 1860's the mine was under the ownership of Mr John Campbell, Son and aAnothera....the aAnothera being Captain Robert Towns who was one of Australia's most energetic colonists.

Also in the 1860's the firm secured the steaming plant formerly owned by Mr Joseph Fleming and thereby were prepared to boil down stock at the rate of 150 head of cattle or 1000 sheep daily (except Sunday).

Redbank became the principle coaling centre for the steamers as they plied between Ipswich and Brisbane on the Brisbane and Bremer Rivers.

The firm also was able to supply sawn timber; either pine or hardwood from its Redbank Saw Mills and sawn timber was exported from Redbank to the ship-building yards of England.

At the time, the partners introduced the system of free education in Queensland because they contributed the teacher's salary themselves and the school teacher was Jane Graham.

On January 30, 1873, the first sod of the Ipswich/Brisbane railway was turned by the Governor, the Marquis of Normanby. …

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