Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Riddle of Early 1920s Women's Footy Team; Do You Know Who These Lady Soccer Players Are?

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Riddle of Early 1920s Women's Footy Team; Do You Know Who These Lady Soccer Players Are?

Article excerpt

Byline: SARA NICHOL

THIS old photo offers a unique glimpse into women's football on Tyneside in the 1920s.

Taken in the years after the First World War, the black-andwhite snap shows the High Spen Women's football team of yesteryear, posing with their coaches.

It was given to grandad Joe Ridley by a family member more than 20 years ago but now the pensioner wants to try and identify the people in the picture.

Mr Ridley's grandmother Mary Briggs is stood at the bottom left and her second husband Joe is stood at the bottom right.

But they are the only people Mr Ridley, 70, formerly from High Spen, Gateshead, but now living in Glasgow, Scotland, recognises and he's trying to find out more about the team.

The snap was thought to have been taken by Mr Ridley's father Joe, known locally as Pip, who worked as a freelance photographer in the area when he wasn't at work in the mines.

Mr Ridley, a dad-of-11, who lives with his wife Conny, said he hoped the photo would be recognised by a Chronicle reader. The former IT company worker said: "The rather dapper couple flanking the team are my grandmother, Mary Elizabeth Briggs (formerly Ripley) and her husband Joe Briggs.

"He died in 1940, so the photo must be from somewhere between the wars, probably in the 20s or 30s.

"I'm not too sure what their connection was with the team.

"Maybe some Chronicle readers can put names to some of the others, which I thought would be a good idea.

"I don''t know who took the photo but we think it was my father, Joe (Pip) Ripley, who was a local freelance photographer and took many of the local wedding photos at the time." Mrs Ridley, 65, said: "Joe's mum died when he was born and it was his grandmother in the picture that looked after him until he was nine.

"He then went in a childrens' home in Medomsley, in Durham, from 13 to 18. He then worked as a stoker on the boats between Hull and Denmark, which is where we met. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.