Newspaper article The Queensland Times (Ipswich, Australia)

City That Sometimes Sleeps; PETER GARDINER Explores What's in Our Own Backyard

Newspaper article The Queensland Times (Ipswich, Australia)

City That Sometimes Sleeps; PETER GARDINER Explores What's in Our Own Backyard

Article excerpt

RUST might never sleep; New York, the songs tell us, never even dozes off a little.

And then some of us world-weary sleepwalkers never wake up to what simple gems of pleasure we have right before us waiting to be discovered. Or rediscovered, as in the case of my long-overdue renewed acquaintance with a Fig Tree Pocket family pearler.

Brisbane at 5am on Monday is caught halfway between holiday mode and midweek workday routines. I don't think there will ever be a market for pre-dawn tourism. This is, after all, a time more for drug-raiding police and even women of the night are looking to actually sleep in their beds.

I have taken to walking the Brisbane CBD at such an insane hour because I love to see a city roll out of its slumbering complacency, stretch and slowly come to life.

When else can you see power walkers carry their nine-to-five plastic-wrapped suits over their shoulders, or even a lightly jogging executive type, already fully locked and loaded into a pin-striped suit and runners. Or aso it goesa street cleaners hosing down the Queen St Mall, delousing the late-night party detritus as unshaven construction workers queue for coffees at the 24 hours a day, 365 days a year Pig 'N' Whistle.

Behind them a lifeless Chanel poster girl poses over handbags so haughty, they don't give the window-shopping wannabes the decency of a price tag to gag over.

There is a compelling grunge feel to this half-conscious Brissie, where harsh life has laid sleeping bag cocoons of homeless people here and there on mall and streetside seat benches.

Across the river Mary Poppins was riding high with her umbrella, in Adelaide St a down-and-out seat sleeper has his or her brolly over them, shielding out a do-care world. Twenty metres away, three chatting cops pay this homeless statistic no attention.

In this early light pre-rush hour, you can stop to admire the small mob of metal kangaroos grazing in George St and the bronzed Petrie Tableau of our early pioneers in a freshly cleaned King George Square. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.