Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Delays by Road, Rail and Air in Post-Snow Struggle Back to Work

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Delays by Road, Rail and Air in Post-Snow Struggle Back to Work

Article excerpt

Byline: Dick Murray and Jack Rivlin

LONDON was battling back to normal today after weekend snowstorms crippled rail, road and air services.

Transport chiefs said all roads were open after conditions were better than forecast overnight, but there was still rail and air travel disruption.

Tens of thousands of train passengers suffered delays, with services from the east into Liverpool Street worst hit. A broken-down train caused major delays on some long-distance mainline routes into Waterloo.

Network Rail and Southeastern, which bore the brunt of the weekend rail disruption, ran empty trains overnight to keep tracks clear. On the roads, the A4 flyover and M25 both closed for a time, triggering traffic queues, while ice warnings were issued.

After a difficult weekend, Heathrow suffered some delays and cancellations with aircraft and crew out of place, but officially ran a normal schedule.

Leon Daniels, Transport for London managing director of surface transport, said: "All of London's strategic road network, and the capital's other major routes, are open.

"We are running 100 per cent of buses with only one route with a minor diversion, trains are operating across all lines on the Tube, DLR and London Overground networks and 4,000 tonnes of grit have been spread across the roads.

"London is moving this morning, and we will be out in force again throughout the day clearing snow, gritting strategic routes and keeping the Tube, DLR and London Overground networks running." Gatwick reported running a full schedule but there was disruption at London City airport.

On the Tube, a broken-down train at Mile End caused delays and Bakerloo line services were temporarily suspended after a train hit a piece of equipment believed to have been left on the track by engineers.

But there was anger that Saturday night's snow, which cloaked parts of London in up to four inches, caused such huge disruption. …

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