Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Crossover Day Is the End of the Line for a Lot of Bills; and Some of Those Casualties Were Once Highly Thought Of

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Crossover Day Is the End of the Line for a Lot of Bills; and Some of Those Casualties Were Once Highly Thought Of

Article excerpt

Byline: Walter C. Jones

ATLANTA | When the gavel sounded Wednesday night to end the legislature's Crossover Day, several bills that had once been in the spotlight had died.

By failing to pass out of the chamber where they were introduced by the end of the 30th day in the 40-day legislative session, the bills cannot be considered as stand-alone legislation. They can be revived as amendments to other bills dealing with the same section of the law, but that's trickier because of parliamentary rules and the likelihood that authors of underlying bills reject the hitchhiker.

There are two significant exceptions to the Crossover rule. Bills dealing with a single city or county aren't affected, nor are those coming from special task forces. Sentencing reform and repealing the sales tax factories pay on energy, which came from the recommendations of special commissions, are two examples that are still expected to pass in the remaining 10 work days.

In most cases, the bills with no life on Crossover Day will stay dead when the session ends. Here are some of the noteworthy fatalities:

- Elimination of the requirement to get a concealed-carry permit in order to have a gun that's not in plain sight. …

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