Newspaper article News Mail Bundaberg Qld.

Raising Kids with Canines

Newspaper article News Mail Bundaberg Qld.

Raising Kids with Canines

Article excerpt

Crystal Jones

crystal.jones@news-mail.com.au

THE old showbiz adage goes that you should never work with animals or children, but it's an option many everyday families don't have as they find themselves juggling the two.

And one of the biggest challenges for new mums and dads with pets can be making sure everyone gets along.

Dog Matters Training Services trainer Tenille Williams said welcoming a baby to a family that already included a dog was all about being prepared and taking the right steps to ensure the household's four-legged friend had time to adjust to the new arrival.

aI encourage people to do a lot of research before getting any new pet and to give their dogs training, especially in preparation for a new baby,a Ms Williams said.

aEarly planning would be the most important thing you can do when preparing to introduce a baby to your dog.a

Ms Williams said integrating a new bub with a pet was simply a matter of preparation and training.

Ms Williams said unless a dog had aggression issues, families shouldn't panic and get rid of their pet without first giving everyone a chance to get along.

Q. Do people tend to rehome their pets when kids come along or are perceptions changing?

A. When people get rid of their pets when kids come along, there can be a couple of reasons for this.

One is that they feel they have a lack of time for the pet so it would be kinder for the dog to go to a new home.

If the dog has ever displayed aggression in the past or is possessive of food, toys or other objects, I would recommend the dog be rehomed to a family without young children.

On a lighter note, a lot of families get a new pet to be part of the family along with their kids and the whole family gets a lot of joy out of pet ownership, this is always great to see.

Q. What steps can families take to make sure their dog will be ready before the baby comes along?

A. The key to making this transition is careful planning and practise long before the baby is due.

Certain breeds are better suited to the family environment and young children than others.

A dog that has been introduced to babies and young children as a young puppy and had a positive experience with them is far more likely to accept them positively in the future. …

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