Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

I Am Given the Silent Treatment but Still Fall in Love with the Flat

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

I Am Given the Silent Treatment but Still Fall in Love with the Flat

Article excerpt

MONDAY I'm getting the silent treatment. Not because someone doesn't like me but because I'm being shown round a minimalist loft apartment in Camden by... a mime artist who refuses to speak. The appointment was made over the phone by his friend who warned me how immersed the owner was in his craft. But I wasn't quite as speechless as I might have been when the features of the property were pointed out to me in a series of nymphlike movements, wide smiles and arching hand gestures. White minimalism prevailed throughout, with not a knickknack or hanging thing in sight. It was my idea of utopia. They say that actions speak louder than words -- and today, for sure, they most certainly did.

TUESDAY I've amassed a few favourite buildings in my 17 years of trotting around London's lofts and warehouses. One of them is Bankside Lofts, the mustard coloured cylinder that's the next-door neighbour to Tate Modern's western entrance. Since it was developed in the late 1990s, we've handled more than 90 per cent of its sales and lettings. So I'm there a lot, and the building has become almost a second home. Today I'm revisiting a duplex with a terrace that we sold a few years back. The owners are now relocating to west London.

I remembered the double-height ceilings but I'd forgotten about that dazzling south-facing terrace. I love Bankside Lofts so much that I recently dedicated an entire blog post to the building, which features the hardest working and most delightful concierge in London.

WEDNESDAY A day of religious conversions -- I am in a church in Clapham. I have to say I find most adaptations of former places of worship to be something of a disappointment.

They're either chopped into tiny pieces with perhaps half an arched window left in a fit of generosity from the developer, or they're just dark. The large pillars can often interfere with light when the buildings are converted, and cutting up the window space just makes things worse. …

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