Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Inviting, Beautiful and So Intriguing; GREAT GOLF HOLES OF THE NORTH the 18th at Hexham NORMAN HARRIS

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Inviting, Beautiful and So Intriguing; GREAT GOLF HOLES OF THE NORTH the 18th at Hexham NORMAN HARRIS

Article excerpt

Byline: NORMAN HARRIS

WAS ever an out-of-bounds line more clearly marked or more important? It's not your typical imaginary line between marker posts, or even a line of thin whitewash.

It's a line of bricks laid end-to-end, which starts at the right-hand corner of the grand Georgian house - the Spital - that is the current clubhouse, follows the edge of a red gravel forecourt, passes excruciatingly close to a tall Locust tree and an Irish Yew, and then zig-zags away around the putting green.

Consider this - it's the last hole, on which a competition may be won or lost, and that line as it edges the red gravel is only ten yards from the green's left-hand bunker.

And consider this - the 18th at Hexham is a green that can be driven. It is only 344 yards and downhill. The vista from the elevated tee is magnificent. And, unusually for a par 4, the tee box gives a clear view of the green, which sits at an intriguing angle to the fairway (it once accommodated the grand house's tennis court). There is probably not a hole in our golf region that is more inviting.

So presumably one's feeling on the last tee, at the end of a good round, is one of great excitement? "To be honest, it's a bit of an anxious feeling," says head pro Andy Paisley. "It should be straightforward, but there's outof-bounds all down the left, and there's some big trees on the right, including a giant redwood. There's no bail-out."

Inviting for some, then, but what awaits in the area of that brick-lined OOB is a modern day equivalent of the sirens on the rocks. Modern folklore at Hexham tells of "hundreds" of balls having gone into the dense, twisting, octopus-like interior of the bushy Irish Yew. And there's a quite recent, startling story of a player who hooked a ball through the righthand window of the clubhouse, whereupon it bounced through the bar area and exited through a back window. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.