Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Foundation Work for Site Manager; in the Latest of Our Features Looking at the Many Processes Involved in Creating a New Home, Homemaker Looks at the Role of a Site Manager

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Foundation Work for Site Manager; in the Latest of Our Features Looking at the Many Processes Involved in Creating a New Home, Homemaker Looks at the Role of a Site Manager

Article excerpt

HAVING examined the purchase of the land and the problems of planning in our focus on the life story of a new home to the moment the new owner moves in, we meet Lee Howard, named an award-winning site manager at this year's National House Building Council's Pride in the Job Awards.

With more than 10 years' experience Lee is responsible for the entire build process - from laying down the foundations to giving that final lick of paint.

The process begins with the preconstruction stage. Lee receives a file of foundation, engineering and architectural drawings, an off-the-ground investigation report which gives depths and ground1-bearing provisions and a list of the contractors.

First to arrive are the road contractors who mark out the roads starting with the construction access roads to allow the delivery of materials. Ground workers then work with the road and sewer team to dig the gas, electric and water supplies.

Next to arrive are the engineers who mark out the houses by satellite coordinates, ensuring the front and backs are a particular length away from the roads, and the gardens are the correct sizes in accordance with the land drawings.

A survey is then completed to ensure the home has been plotted out correctly.

Lee explained: "A house must be built on the most appropriate foundations to ensure it stands the test of time. For instance if the home is to be built near a woodland area the floors have to be block and beam so tree routes cannot surface. If it is to be built on sandy ground raft foundations are used to minimise slippage."

After an initial assessment by the NHBC, which give a 10-year guarantee on most new homes, the corners are marked out then brick layers start building the walls.

Initially walls are built to damp proof course level and drains are inserted. …

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