Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Local Hospital Execs like Ruling on Health Care; but a GOP Congressman Says He'll Be Voting to 'Fully Repeal' the Law

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Local Hospital Execs like Ruling on Health Care; but a GOP Congressman Says He'll Be Voting to 'Fully Repeal' the Law

Article excerpt

Byline: Charlie Patton

The chief executives of Baptist Health, St. Vincent's HealthCare and Memorial Hospital all hailed Thursday's Supreme Count decision that upheld most of the provisions of the health care law.

But U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, a Jacksonville Republican, spoke for many of the opponents of the law, in a statement released by his office: "ObamaCare was bad law yesterday, and it is bad law today. That's why I will vote once again to fully repeal ObamaCare when it comes to the House floor in two weeks."

Most of the major impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act takes effect in 2014, including the mandate that individuals must buy health insurance or pay a tax and the provision that insurers cannot deny coverage to those with pre-existing conditions.

But one part of the law that the Supreme Court overturned, requiring states to expand their Medicaid coverage, could have a direct impact on Florida. Gov. Rick Scott would not say whether the state will opt out of the Medicaid expansion, The Associated Press reported.

Florida has 3.85 million uninsured residents, about 21 percent of the population.

Scott, who has been a sharp opponent of the health care overhaul, also would not say whether the state will set up its own health care market as required under the law. Health exchanges would allow individuals and small businesses to comparison shop for private health insurance.

Florida, the lead state in suing to overturn the overhaul, has rejected or declined to pursue more than $106 million from the federal government and has returned $4.5 million, according to the Associated Press. The state has its own health insurance exchanges, mainly for small businesses, but without an individual mandate. The state has not implemented an exchange that would meet the requirements of the federal law.

Jonathan Lyon, a professor of business and finance at Florida State College at Jacksonville's Kent Campus, who has taught courses on insurance for 30 years, said the law probably will benefit both the employees and the owners of small businesses, with less than 25 employees, "who may see some tax benefits. …

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