Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Former Fire Station to Be New Nursery; Apartments Idea Shelved for Community RADIO PRESENTER INVITES YOU TO JOIN 10km TREK

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Former Fire Station to Be New Nursery; Apartments Idea Shelved for Community RADIO PRESENTER INVITES YOU TO JOIN 10km TREK

Article excerpt

Byline: Brian Daniel

A FORMER fire station in a Northumberland village is to reopen as a children's nursery. The redundant building at Rothbury is being given the unusual new lease of life by Eamonn Gribben, who has converted a former police station into a nursery.

The former police authority worker and dyslexic almost converted the building into retirement apartments, but had a last-minute change of heart.

Mr Gribben, 52, who lives at Parkshiel in South Shields, had to attend "remedial" classes at school because of his dyslexia, and it was this that would later see him look to go into business setting up and running nurseries.

He worked for Northumbria Police Authority as a mechanical surveyor but gave it up to pursue his new career.

Mr Gribben initially converted the former police station at South Shields into Noah's Ark Nursery, the name of his venture which has been operational 12 years and now employs 46 people. He has since opened two other nurseries at Hebburn and Westoe village.

Mr Gribben also owns holiday cottages, including some at Alwinton he has had for seven years. It was while travelling to the village that he passed the old fire station on Garleigh Road in Rothbury, and saw it was for sale.

Mr Gribben believed the site could be converted into a nursery and bought it from Northumberland County Council two years ago.

Since then, the businessman has allowed the authority to store sandbags on site in case of flooding in the village.

However, he had a change of heart, believing there were insufficient children in the area to sustain a nursery.

Mr Gribben had drawings done and had even got as far as submitting plans to the council and paying for them, for the conversion of the building into 14 retirement apartments.

However, he decided to go back to the original plan, claiming the apartment idea did not feel right and he had allowed a builder to lead that project while he was suffering from heart problems. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.