Newspaper article The Observer (Gladstone, Australia)

Dona[euro][TM]t Train Your Strongest Leg

Newspaper article The Observer (Gladstone, Australia)

Dona[euro][TM]t Train Your Strongest Leg

Article excerpt

TRIATHLON training, and in particular ironman training, is an art form. Or at least getting it right is an art form.

There are so many variables, and so many programs that you could choose from (or coaches to choose from, for that matter), that it is sometimes hard to know what exactly is right for you. If you are self-trained, like the Guinster, you need to know enough to at least get you over the finish line under your goal time. The challenge is how much time do you spend training and what areas do you train the most.

The one bit of advice I give to people training for triathlon, and trying to work out how to get bang for their training buck, is to start with your alimitera. That means to work out which leg of the triathlon you are weakest in and start there. If you are training for triathlon, up to say Olympic distance, your swim leg is nearly as important as the bike or the run leg. Even though you canat win a short distance triathlon in the water, you can certainly lose it. So, if swimming is your limiter, that is where you should start when developing your training program. I work on the four, three, two rule, which means if you give yourself nine sessions per week, four should be spent on your weakest leg, three on your next weakest, then two on your strongest leg. If you train smart, two sessions are enough to maintain a high standard over a short distance triathlon in your strongest discipline. Most people spend four sessions training their strongest leg, and see only few gains overall. Donat fall into that trap.

For the ironman, although the concept is similar a not to over-train your strongest leg a the process is different. Because an ironman triathlon is such a long event, with a long bike ride bookended with a swim and a longish run, you have no option other than to focus on your bike leg. …

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