Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Spring into Action with Lamb Feast; FOOD with Andrew Wilkinson of David Kennedy's Food Social

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Spring into Action with Lamb Feast; FOOD with Andrew Wilkinson of David Kennedy's Food Social

Article excerpt

MY little girls love Timmy Time on CBeebies - the little lamb with a lot to learn. I'm more partial to Timmy's troublesome uncle, Shaun the Sheep, a ruminant who doesn't follow the flock.

He's a tough old ram who, if ever stupid enough to get caught, would require a lot of cooking. Mutton dressed as lamb as the saying goes.

But mutton is for another season.

With Easter just around the corner it's time for spring lamb to have its time in the culinary spotlight.

Nothing says spring more than seeing the fields full of frolicking lambs. It's a sight guaranteed to brighten even the dullest March day.

It almost makes you wish those fun-loving lambs weren't destined for the roasting tin - almost, but not quite.

I have to say I'm an out-and-out carnivore. Vegetarian food is fantastic - there are some fabulous recipes around these days - but the meat-eater in me will always win out.

And at the moment it is lamb at the fore of my thinking.

There is something very British, wholesome and traditional about spring lamb. Sheep are an integral part of our landscape and it's that very terrain that helps make UK lamb among the finest in the world (if not the best, although I'm sure the French, New Zealanders and Australians would argue until the death on that one).

But for me nothing beats that coming out of the North East. The uplands of Northumberland especially are famed for the quality of their lamb, which is sweet and tender thanks to the fact the animals feed on heather, grass and wild herbs and are allowed to roam freely.

And because the sheep spend their lives grazing in all weathers, the meat is as unadulterated and natural as you can get.

We favour the multi-award-winning Ingram Valley Lamb here at Food Social, which is bred and reared in the Cheviot foothills of Northumberland National Park. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.