Newspaper article The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia)

Art isna[euro][TM]t Just for the People A[euro][approximately]in the knowa[euro][TM], ita[euro][TM]s for Everyone

Newspaper article The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia)

Art isna[euro][TM]t Just for the People A[euro][approximately]in the knowa[euro][TM], ita[euro][TM]s for Everyone

Article excerpt

Byline: Ken Leslie Rockhampton Artist

EACH year, the Art Gallery of New South Wales puts on what is known as Australiaas most extraordinary art event, the Archibald Prize. Unfortunately, it may be one of the only times in the year when the general public gives a tinkeras cuss about contemporary art.

So why do art critics seem to give it so much grief?

Each year, mud is slung at the Archibald by those whose opinion weare all supposed to trust because theyare the professionals. In The Australian, Christopher Allen gave us the angle that thereas too much painting based on photography and that the whole show is staged for people who donat know anything about art. John McDonald (writing for The Sydney Morning Herald) on the other hand, called Del Kathryn Bartonas 2013 winning portrait of Hugo Weaving abasically a coloured-in drawing, as much an illustration as a paintinga. In a fairly scathing preview of the prize, McDonald referred to some of the finalistas work as cloying, stultifying, unpleasant, and trying too hard. So, the Archibald Prize features too much work that looks like a photo, paintings that are little more than illustration, or are flat and dull, or generally not up to standard. Itas the same kind of people who complain that thereas not enough funding for the arts in Australia, but you canat take the line that the arts should be totally elitist and at the same time expect the general public to fork over tons of cash to keep it going.

At least contemporary art is getting some sorely-needed exposure.

The one thing that the critics all seem to agree on is that the trustees of AGNSW, the folks who select the winner, have no idea what theyare on about. There are so many art prizes around the nation all year round which are judged by critics, curators, directors and an assortment of other arts professionals, why shouldnat there be one judged by an arbitrary group of arts-interested apolitical cronies and captains of industrya? …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.