Newspaper article The Queensland Times (Ipswich, Australia)

Whitehead Studios Put Magic in Photographs; Ipswich Business Has Chronicled citya[euro][TM]s History for Generations

Newspaper article The Queensland Times (Ipswich, Australia)

Whitehead Studios Put Magic in Photographs; Ipswich Business Has Chronicled citya[euro][TM]s History for Generations

Article excerpt

Byline: Peter Foley peter.foley@qt.com.au

FOR most of Ipswichas time as a city, one of the most enduring and familiar names connected to its evolution has been Whitehead Studios.

One hundred and thirty years ago, FA Whitehead developed the original image for generations of his family to reproduce and enhance.

Current owner Gordon Reeves is the keeper of the flame of Whiteheadas and is determined to keep it alive despite technological competition.

aIn 1883 FA Whitehead was working for a photographer he went to Ipswich Grammar School with, a kid called Pochee, and he took over Tissingtonas studio in Ellenborough St and that became Whiteheadas. And he was only 19,a Mr Reeves said.

aIn 1896, FA Whitehead was invited to photograph the family of Lord Lamington, Governor of Queensland, allowing the business to proudly display the words, a[approximately]Under the Patronage of His Excellency The Right Honourable Lord Lamingtona.

aFA Whiteheadas sons took over after that and their sons took over after that. I moved over from Western Australia in 2000 and John gave me a job in 2001.

aThen he retired because he was in his 70s. I was sort of managing the business and in 2004 Greg and I sat down and me and my wife and my brother and sister-in-law bought the business. They were happy for us to keep the name and keep it going and thatas what I wanted to do because itas such a big thing in Ipswich and south-east Queensland.

aJohn said head gone from plates to black and white to colour. He sort of said I could take the digital and run with it.a

The handover coincided with a relocation to the current premises at 43 Darling St.

It was also a time when competition was swirling around, mainly from the widespread use of digital cameras, mobile phone cameras and cheap prints.

aItas certainly slowed down; I mean, gone are the days when Whiteheadas employed something like 50 people and they used to have couriers going as far as Tasmania with colour film,a Mr Reeves said. …

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