Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Do Only Phoney Photographers Photograph with Their Phones? in the Latest in His Series on Extraordinary UNPHOTOSHOPPED Images, Our Columnist Looks at the Impact of Cameraphone Pictures

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Do Only Phoney Photographers Photograph with Their Phones? in the Latest in His Series on Extraordinary UNPHOTOSHOPPED Images, Our Columnist Looks at the Impact of Cameraphone Pictures

Article excerpt

Byline: Charles Saatchi The Naked Eye

THE 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was the first global news event where the majority of the firstday news footage was no longer provided by professional news crews, but rather by Citizen Journalists using camera phones.

Cameraphone videos and photographs taken in the immediate aftermath of the July 7 2005 London bombings were featured worldwide on global TV channels.

On December 30 2006, the hanging of former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein was recorded by a video cameraphone, and made widely available on the internet. The guard responsible was arrested a few days later.

Most photographs today are taken on smartphones rather than cameras. Besides shredding the camera industry, the smartphone is replacing watches, alarm clocks and laptops; they are also replacing books, via ebooks, and games consoles. Even TV and movie-watching on a phone is commonplace now. People use phones to film and photograph more than they do to talk.

There used to be the perception that you can only take a "proper" photograph with a "proper" camera. No longer.

Not only does the quality of the camera on leading smartphones enable you to take pictures sharp enough for high resolution reproduction, but with Zeiss lenses and 16 megapixels becoming the standard, their qualifications match most standalone digital cameras.

And of course on a smartphone you can transmit your picture globally in seconds, creating our new world of citizen journalism (I say you can transmit, because I am too befuddled to use anything but an elderly Nokia, no functions to frustrate and embarrass me -- it simply makes and receives calls).

According to Jay Rosen, Professor of Journalism at New York University, citizen journalists are "the people formerly known as the audience, who were on the receiving end of a media system that ran one way, in a broadcasting pattern, with high entry fees and a few firms competing to speak very loudly while the rest of the population listened in isolation from one another; but today the people formerly known as the audience are simply the public made realer, less fictional, more able, less predictable. …

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