Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Setting Tyneside. History in Stone; Historic Landmarks Get National Heritage Boost

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Setting Tyneside. History in Stone; Historic Landmarks Get National Heritage Boost

Article excerpt

Byline: TONY HENDERSON

HISTORIC structures from a drinking fountain to a cast iron direction sign have been nationally listed in a heritage boost for Tyneside.

Over the last several months, English Heritage has been carrying out a survey of North Tyneside's historic landmarks.

The survey was carried out after North Tyneside Council asked English Heritage to look at its Local Register of buildings and structures for which people had nominated their best-loved choices. Now a range of attractions have been nationally listed.

Nick Bridgland, English Heritage designation team leader for the North, said: "North Tyneside is full of great architecture and these listings reflect this, joining the likes of the Spanish City Dome and Tynemouth Station. They all add up to what makes this area special."

John Harrison, cabinet member for the environment for North Tyneside Council said: "This is great news not only for North Tyneside Council but also for our community who started off the process through their Local Register nominations. Key parts of our local heritage have been recognised as nationally important and has been a great example of what local communities can achieve by linking their efforts with partners in central and local government."

New listings include...

? North Shields Mechanics Institute and Free Library in Saville Street. Dating from 1857-8, it became the first free library on Tyneside.

? RC Church of St Edward, Coquet Avenue, Whitley Bay.

Built 1926-8 to the designs of Stienlet & Maxwell of Newcastle.

A painted Descent from the Cross was added to the organ case in 1945 as a memorial to parishioners and members of the Tyneside Irish Regiment who fell in the Second World War.

? Art deco drinking fountain, Northern Promenade, Whitley Bay, erected in 1937 to mark the coronation of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth.

? Seven sewer gas lamps in Monkseaton and Whitley Bay.

The lamps drew air from the sewer through a copper tube inside the column, converting methane into carbon dioxide before being released into the atmosphere. …

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