Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Editors Make the Cut after Upheaval; While Recording Their Fourth Album, Editors' Original Guitarist Left the Band. Frontman Tom Smith Talks to Andy Welch about the Emotional Upheaval and the Resulting New Music

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Editors Make the Cut after Upheaval; While Recording Their Fourth Album, Editors' Original Guitarist Left the Band. Frontman Tom Smith Talks to Andy Welch about the Emotional Upheaval and the Resulting New Music

Article excerpt

Byline: Andy Welch

IT'S BEEN four years since Editors released their third album, In This Light On This Evening. Since then, they've performed for hundreds of thousands of people all over the world, but then seemed to vanish.

They might have returned sooner, if not for some personnel changes along the way which took them some time to sort out. After a traumatic period, original guitarist Chris Urbanowicz left the band, or rather was asked to leave.

"We did about a year, 18 months of rehearsing and recording," says frontman Tom Smith. "Things were OK in the band; we had some songs that we were kicking around and we were quite pleased with the recordings."

Then, after living with the songs for a few weeks, it transpired they weren't actually good enough. They went back to the studio, recorded some more, and the same thing happened.

"For the first time in the band's history, we didn't like what we were writing," explains Smith.

"There was no excitement, nothing. After that, back in the rehearsal room, things got really dark. We didn't fight or anything, but communication totally broke down, we all stopped talking, and we realised collectively we wanted to go on without Chris."

As Urbanowicz lives in New York, and the rest of the band in London, Smith doesn't think he'll bump into their ex-guitarist any time soon, a good job considering "things ended very badly" and that "it's still very raw".

On a more positive note, whatever changes Editors made, they worked.

They released their debut, The Back Room, in 2005 after forming three years previously. Friends from Staffordshire University where they met studying music technology, they bonded over a love of REM, Echo And The Bunnymen and U2.

Soon after forming, and after going through several name changes - Pilot, The Pride and Snowfield - there was a scramble to sign them. When their debut eventually went to number two in the album chart, it was understandable why there was such a race to get their names on a contract. …

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