Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Taste May Change, but We Still Love Our Food; the Science Behind What We Ate and What We'll Eat in Future

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Taste May Change, but We Still Love Our Food; the Science Behind What We Ate and What We'll Eat in Future

Article excerpt

Byline: Rachel Wearmouth? 0191 201 6477 ? rachel.wearmouth@ncjmedia.co.uk

FOOD from the future will join dishes from decades ago and treats from today as part of a science festival.

It is all part of the British Science Festival which visits the region in a six-day celebration from September 7 to 12.

In association with EAT! Newcastle Gateshead, the festival of food and drink produced by the Newcastle Gateshead Initiative, this year's British Science Festival sees a strand of food-themed events that will feed the mind as well as the body.

The British Science Festival kicks off its seventh visit to Tyneside with a launch event that will look at the science of what we eat, how we eat it and why.

Chefs Gareth Kyle and Sam Storey will turn back the clock and explore what might have been on the menu when the British Science Festival first came to Newcastle in 1838.

Their sample dishes will reflect public taste, availability of ingredients and food trends that have been shaped by different points in our history, focussing on the festival's separate visits to the city.

It will then look ahead to what we might be eating when the festival returns - perhaps in 2038, 200 years after the original event.

Simon Preston, EAT! Festival Director who has worked with Newcastle University and the British Science Festival, said: "There are some really interesting parallels between our attitude to food then and now.

"For instance, at the time of the Dig for Victory campaign in the war years, Britain became very much an island again when our ports were bombed and food supplies were halted and the country had to learn again how to be self-sufficient.

"People were encouraged to grow their own and rediscover traditional recipes reversing the scramble for foods imported from far flung places, once reserved for the super-rich.

"Now we are concerned for the environment and people are once again beginning to discover how cooking with local produce can not only help protect the beautiful place we live but also to be part of celebrating our unique culture." Professor David Kennedy, Director of Brain Performance and Nutrition Research at Northumbria University, will also join forces with his chef namesake, who was named North East Chef of the Year in 2007. …

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