Newspaper article Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England)

Nothing Better Than Parking Up at Gates; REMEMBER WHEN VAL HARRISON, Honorary Editor of the Cleveland and Teesside Local History Society's Cleveland History Publication Looks at Her Favourite Part of Her Home Town

Newspaper article Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England)

Nothing Better Than Parking Up at Gates; REMEMBER WHEN VAL HARRISON, Honorary Editor of the Cleveland and Teesside Local History Society's Cleveland History Publication Looks at Her Favourite Part of Her Home Town

Article excerpt

DO you have a favourite place in your home town? Mine is the part of Linthorpe Road, in Middlesbrough, near the main park gates to Albert Park.

I remember an interview many years ago with musician Chris Rea, whose family owned the ice cream empire.

He used to live above the cafe just over the road from the park gates. He said he loved to look out of the window at that view, and I'm sure I wouldn't tire of it either.

To me this seems to be a part of Middlesbrough that hasn't changed much in 100 years - OK, a little tweaking with the road layout for the better, no cars parked round the Cenotaph any more - but the rest of it is constant, down to the beautifully kept flowerbeds. Stand at the Cenotaph, based on the one in Whitehall designed by Edwin Lutyens, and look in one direction and you will see the fine old Methodist church which was opened in 1905 by the wife of Amos Hinton, now sympathetically converted into apartments.

There are modern buildings opposite but designed in a complementary style, and thriving shops and businesses over the road in the Edwardian terraces.

Turn around and you will see the entrance to the ever beautiful Albert Park and the dignified memorial walls that stand in honour of those lost during The Great War. Then take a quarter turn to your right and you will see the Dorman Museum which was officially opened in 1904 as a memorial itself to George Lockwood Dorman, the son of local industrialist Sir Arthur, who died in the Boer War.

When I was going through the Marton Grove School log books a few years ago I found that classes visited on a regular basis from the school's opening in 1928.

If Marton Grove children visited, then I'm sure that all the central Middlesbrough schools must have done too.

Mention the Dorman Museum to people over a certain age, and there will be three things they remember.

One: The lion. My grandma would tell me about how the lion (which stood on its own when I was small) stood over a zebra that he had seemingly just killed and it was quite shocking! …

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