Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Laughing Tom Still Loves Stand-Up Rush; If Audiences Find Tom Stade as Funny as He Finds Himself, They're in for a Treat-and-a-Half. SAM WONFOR Talks to the Giggling Canadian

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Laughing Tom Still Loves Stand-Up Rush; If Audiences Find Tom Stade as Funny as He Finds Himself, They're in for a Treat-and-a-Half. SAM WONFOR Talks to the Giggling Canadian

Article excerpt

Byline: SAM WONFOR

TOM Stade answers the phone like I've just woken him up. It's 11am and, according to his tour date list, the Canadian, who lives in Edinburgh, wasn't gigging last night. Or either of the two nights before that.

So what's the father-of-two's excuse for sleeping in and being in urgent need of coffee? "I fell asleep on the sofa watching American Psycho," he says. "I don't usually go in for those things, but I like that guy Christian Bale. I had three days off from touring Sammy," he continues, through a heavily-accented yawn, "and I'm not used to taking many breaks... plus I'm trying to quit smoking and this is like my second day. I'm a little flustered." He's also more than a little giggly, to the point that for a long time I think he's joking when he tells me the in-laws he acquired when he married his wife of 17 years, Trudie, actually hail from Newcastle, and her British citizenship was the reason they were able to move to the UK... I'm still not 100% sure.

During the interview - which quickly develops its own canned laughter soundtrack - there are many answers delivered through what I can only assume is a chortle filter, meanwhile a tangent exploring the notion of putting stand-up comedy on the curriculum of a seven-year-old, quickly produces a very infectious bout of hysteria.

This is a regular occurrence when you're in Tom's born-performer presence though. "When I'm on stage, I'll normally connect with a couple of people who will be laughing uncontrollably," he says. "And then I start laughing uncontrollably with them, because I know what the next thing I'm gonna say is... and I know it's gonna floor 'em. It's beautiful."

Having spent more than a decade doing his distinctive, slightly drunken-style thing in the UK - and around eight years gigging in Canada before that - Tom says the lure of the singular mic on a stage only deepens as time marches on. "I was gone the first time I went on stage to do stand up in 1989," he says. "That rush of making people laugh... there's nothing like it - probably because it's the most difficult thing to do.

"I can walk in a room and make people angry or sad - everybody can do that. …

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