Newspaper article Sunshine Coast Daily (Maroochydore, Australia)

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire Games Have a New Fire; like Watching a Bloodier Version of It's A Knockout

Newspaper article Sunshine Coast Daily (Maroochydore, Australia)

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire Games Have a New Fire; like Watching a Bloodier Version of It's A Knockout

Article excerpt

Byline: Geoffrey MacNab

THE second instalment of the Hunger Games franchise is an improvement on its predecessor.

This is a darker, more mature film which accentuates further the Orwellian elements in the Suzanne Collins novels from which it is adapted.

It benefits from another full-blooded performance from Jennifer Lawrence as the tough, single-minded warrior heroine Katniss Everdeen.

There is strong support, too, from a cast which now includes Philip Seymour Hoffman as Plutarch Heavensbee, the duplicitous new "games maker".

It's just a pity that when the battle finally starts, you again have the feeling you're watching a bloodier version of It's A Knockout - a glorified games show rather than a proper movie.

As the story begins, Katniss is back home in District 12 after winning the 74th Hunger Games. Her family and the other residents of the district still live in abject poverty.

The ruthless and cynical President Snow (Donald Sutherland) wants her to go on a "victory tour" and to try to fool the masses that she is deeply in love with her co-survivor from the Games Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson).

Francis Lawrence (taking over directorial duties from Gary Ross) accentuates the brutality in the early scenes.

President Snow is a fascist leader. Katniss is in the unfortunate position of being a poster girl for a regime she loathes. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.