Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Killer Looks; Fashion Next Week Bret Easton Ellis's Anti-Hero Lands from New York for a Sold-Out Run at the Almeida Theatre. Karen Dacre Hails American Psycho's Sharp Style

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Killer Looks; Fashion Next Week Bret Easton Ellis's Anti-Hero Lands from New York for a Sold-Out Run at the Almeida Theatre. Karen Dacre Hails American Psycho's Sharp Style

Article excerpt

Byline: Karen Dacre

WHEN Bret Easton Ellis published American Psycho back in 1991 it was mauled by critics; literary experts found the violence gory and gratuitous, women baulked at the misogyny while others suggested that Easton Ellis was taking a cheap shot for global notoriety with a novel that couldn't help but dominate headlines.

What was never disputed in the days and years before the novel was adorned with the cult classic status it enjoys now (American Psycho was later made into a critically acclaimed film starring Christian Bale and, in recent years, a stage show which arrives in London from Broadway next week) was its importance to luxury fashion. Never before had a world in which logos serve as currency been captured so perfectly in fiction. And crucially, never before had we met a character like Patrick Bateman -- a serial designer clothes wearer who considers his Valentino couture suit and Oliver Peoples spectacles far more significant to his life than any of the horrendous murders he commits.

This week, ahead of the musical's arrival at the Almeida, Londoners are once again going crazy for the ultimate modern-day anti-hero.

As well as being sold out, the show, directed by Rupert Goold and starring former Doctor Who Matt Smith, is being honoured by menswear e-tailer MRPORTER.COM, which has enlisted iconic photographer Miles Aldridge to create a one-off campaign inspired by Bateman and the predatory 1980s Wall Street world he incarnates.

Aldridge's haunting vision shows various actors from the production including Smith and Les Miserables star Hugh Skinner sharply kitted out in a host of Mr Porter favourites including shirts by Turnbull and Asser, ties by Lanvin and suits by Gucci. The images, inspired by Francis Bacon's lonely ectoplasmic shadow, are displayed on pop coloured backgrounds.

"Photographing the actors on a slow shutter speed meant their movements created Bacon-esque brush strokes with a ghost-like transparency which seemed to reveal the dark vacuum of emptiness inside the characters," says Aldridge. …

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