Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Concerns over 'Privatisation' of Heritage Sites

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Concerns over 'Privatisation' of Heritage Sites

Article excerpt

Byline: Adrian Pearson Regional affairs correspondent Adrian.Pearson@ncjmedia.co.uk

Warkworth Castle and hermitage PARTS of the North East's cultural heritage could be put at risk as the Government seeks to end its responsibility for historic sites.

Ministers are part-way through plans to reform English Heritage and create a charitable arm responsible for the National Heritage Collection.

The Government hopes that an PS80m cash injection will mean the quango no longer needs taxpayer support.

But concerns have now emerged that the moves will see properties put at risk as the reformed English Heritage struggles to pay for all its assets.

In the North East, English Heritage is responsible for key tourism attractions such as Belsay Hall, Lindisfarne Priory, Warkworth Castle and Dunstanburgh Castle.

As well as those flagship sites there are many others which, while contributing to the overall worth of region's heritage, do not individually draw in large numbers of visitors.

Culture ministers have been warned of the potential downside of their reforms in a joint response by the region's 12 local authorities.

The Association of North East Councils has said it wants to ensure the changes do not create a situation in which only the sites which generate the most revenue are protected, instead of the entire collection.

And former regional minister Nick Brown has added to the warnings. He said: "The Government's proposal has two obvious flaws. The loss of expertise will be damaging in the long run because the advice from a well informed independent authority will no longer be there.

"Secondly, our country's heritage should not be reduced to a historically themed version of Disneyland. It should be preserved, treasured and valued for present and future generations."

Urging caution of the unknown costs involved, the Association said: "This is an ambitious plan, with yet another organisation competing for the same sources of commercial and philanthropic funding as similar organisations." The councils said: "In the North East there is concern over the protection of historic buildings that may not necessarily generate large amounts of income and instead rely on a subsidy, yet are nonetheless key to the collection and bring in wider economic and social benefits to the local community in terms of tourism. …

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