Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

McQueen, the King of Oscars Night, Jumps for Joy; Londoner Picks Up Best Film Trophy as 12 Years and Gravity Steal the Show

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

McQueen, the King of Oscars Night, Jumps for Joy; Londoner Picks Up Best Film Trophy as 12 Years and Gravity Steal the Show

Article excerpt

Byline: Louise Jury and David Gardner

THE British film industry celebrated a triumphant night at the Oscars, with 12 Years A Slave named best picture and Gravity scooping seven awards.

Londoner Steve McQueen made history as the first black director to win the top prize in 86 rounds of Academy Awards for his unflinching story of American slavery.

Accepting the Oscar with producer Brad Pitt, he thanked the strong women in his life, including his mother, and said: "Everyone deserves not just to survive but to live. I dedicate this award to all the people who have endured slavery."

The Turner prize-winning director then jumped for joy on stage.

His film also won an honour for Lupita Nyong'o as best supporting actress in her movie debut. She thanked McQueen, and her co-stars Chiwetel Ejiofor and Michael Fassbender, who missed out on awards. She also paid homage to her character, saying: "It doesn't escape me for one moment that so much joy in my life is thanks to so much pain in someone else's, and so I want to salute the spirit of Patsey, for her guidance."

John Ridley became only the second black man to win a screenplay award for his adaptation of the memoir of Solomon Northup, a free man sold as a slave in pre-Civil War Louisiana, the story that formed the basis of the film.

Though Gravity missed best picture, it was also a big winner. The space thriller, starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney, was shot at Pinewood and Shepperton Studios by London-based Mexican Alfonso Cuaron, who picked up the Oscar for best director.

Its mainly British crew swept the technical awards for groundbreaking work conveying life in space.

Its four-man sound-mixing technician team, including three Britons, took the sound-mixing Oscar.

Another Briton Glenn Freemantle was recognised for best sound editing, while Tim Webber and the team from Soho's Framestore won for special effects. …

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