Newspaper article The Northern Star (Lismore, Australia)

Veteran Still Landing Punches in Small-Sedan Fight; despite It Getting Long in the Tooth, Vani Naidoo Reveals a Sedan Which Still Ticks Value and Practicality Boxes

Newspaper article The Northern Star (Lismore, Australia)

Veteran Still Landing Punches in Small-Sedan Fight; despite It Getting Long in the Tooth, Vani Naidoo Reveals a Sedan Which Still Ticks Value and Practicality Boxes

Article excerpt

Vital statistics

Model: Mitsubishi Lancer ES.

Details: Five-door front-wheel drive small sedan.

Transmission: Five-speed manual or continuously variable automatic (as tested).

Engine: 2.0-litre MiVEC four-cylinder petrol generating maximum power of 110kW @ 6000rpm and peak torque of 197Nm @ 4200rpm.

Consumption: 7.2litres/100km (manual 6.9l/100km).

CO2: 169g/km.

Bottom line plus on-roads: $22,240 (manual at $19,990).

YOU couldn't confuse the Lancer ES for fussy and frilly. In fact it plainly favours the necessities over luxuries, hoping to wow instead with space on hand and an affordable price. It certainly attracts the interest, even if it is just briefly, and while it delivers in most respects some areas are decidedly better than others.

There are some good deals around at the moment on the Lancer, with this model we sampled retailing for $22,240 - but we have seen great drive-away deals for less than $22K for the automatic.

Despite the advantages of its what-you-see-is-what-you-get approach, the Lancer, now in its seventh year, is looking a bit tired.

Comfort

The interior of the ES is light and airy with plenty of room to stretch out. The look is dated though, with plenty of hard plastics and very little texture, although there is a certain practicality in layout and design. Instrument dials and buttons are placed well, while consideration has been given to the angle of the dash and stereo screen.

There is room for water bottles, phones and the other odds and ends we travel with these days.

The leather-wrapped steering wheel feels solid to the touch but with limited steering adjustment it takes work to find the best driving position.

While the front seats are supportive and comfortable, those in the back have to make do with a pew that is much flatter.

However, both leg and headroom in the second row is generous, among the best in this small-medium class, as is the boot, which can happily deal with luggage and the groceries as is your want.

On the road

The Lancer ES is powered by a 2.0-litre MiVEC four-cylinder engine paired either to a five-speed manual or a continually variable transmission. Our auto test car was easy to drive, handling well around inner city trickeries and during longer trips on the highway.

The CVT marches along well, provided of course you are accustomed to the steady drone when it holds a gear too long when descending or ascending a hill.

Steering is responsive and it holds its line through a corner but the suspension is a bit on the hard side and you are likely to feel the bumps more often than not.

The ES lacks a bit of power in the low ranges and it had to be persuaded along until it builds up speed. It feels a bit lacklustre, even with just two people in the car, a far cry indeed from its racing roots. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.