Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

The Batteries May Be Dead, but the Search for MH370 Goes on; It Is a Story That Will Not Have a Happy Ending. but the Search for the Missing Malaysian Jet Will Continue until It Is Found. DAVID LUCAS Reports

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

The Batteries May Be Dead, but the Search for MH370 Goes on; It Is a Story That Will Not Have a Happy Ending. but the Search for the Missing Malaysian Jet Will Continue until It Is Found. DAVID LUCAS Reports

Article excerpt

Byline: DAVID LUCAS

FOLLOWING four strong underwater signals in the past week, all has gone quiet in the hunt for the missing Malaysia Airlines jet.

It means the batteries in the plane's all-important black boxes may finally have died.

The fate of MH370 has created new "experts" and theorists all over the world as we ponder what could have happened to the jet and the 239 people on board when it vanished on March 8. From the workings of Boeing 777s to the private lives of the pilots, the competency of the Malaysian government, the georgraphy of the southern Indian ocean and the meaning and frequency of black box "pings" - all have been picked over in exhaustive detail.

Yet, unlike the great missing aircraft mysteries of the past, those closest to the investigation are confident that this will be solved.

One day the aircraft - or what is left of it - will be found. It may be today, or tomorrow. Or it may be next week or next month. Or it may take years.

Despite having no new transmissions from the black boxes' locator beacons to go on, air and sea crews were continuing their search in the southern Indian Ocean yesterday for debris and any sounds that may still be emanating. They are desperately trying to pinpoint where the Boeing 777 could be amid an enormous patch of deep ocean.

No new electronic pings have been detected since Tuesday by an Australian ship dragging a US Navy device that listens for flight recorder signals.

But that is not by any means to end of the search. Once officials are confident that no more sounds will be heard, a robotic submersible will be sent down to slowly scour for wreckage.

"We're now into Day 37 of this tragedy," said aviation expert Geoffrey Thomas yesterday. "The battery life on the beacons is supposed to last 30 days. We're hoping it might last 40 days. However, it's been four or five days since the last strong pings. What they're hoping for is to get one more, maybe two more pings so they can do a triangulation of the sounds and try and narrow the (search) area."

Recovering the plane's flight data and cockpit voice recorders is essential for investigators to try to figure out what happened to Flight 370, which disappeared on March 8. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.